Lesson 12 - Fairytales Change

Lesson Objectives:


  • Students will form and refine a question for investigation, using a topic of personal choice, and answer that question through print and media sources.
  • Students will report the research in an appropriate form for a specified audience.
  • Students will express an informed opinion that is logical and coherent and states clearly a personal view while engaging the reader's interest or curiosity.
  • Students will support an informed opinion by providing relevant and convincing reasons.
  • Students will use various types of evidence, such as experience or facts.
  • Students will use appropriate and effective language, reasons, and organizational structure for the audience and purpose.
  • Students will evaluate the effectiveness of communication.
  • Students will read and critique various genres using preparation, engagement, and reflection strategies appropriate for the text.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to read, listen to and view a variety of increasingly complex print and non-print literacy texts.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of conventional written and spoken expression.
  • Students will discern and correct errors in spoken and written English.

As we've seen in previous lessons, fairytales (indeed, all folktales) change. Some changes are due to time, some due to the age of the intended audience, some due to the history of the time in which they are being told: Basically tales are changed, either slightly or greatly, to change their message.

In today's world, many folktales are changed to fit other media, and certain audience age-groups. One corporation which has done this with many tales is the Disney corporation. For this lesson, select a movie by Disney that is a recreated folktale. You are going to watch the movie and read at least two versions of the folktale (or do research into the original story, depending), and make extensive comparisons and commentary.

There are two parts to this assignment, so read carefully below before you watch any movie.

Assignment

Grading Rubric:

10: All answers are correct within the second revision of this lesson. Answers are correct, complete, and clear; all lesson requirements have been met. All answers are in complete sentences with correct grammar and spelling.

9: All answers are correct within the third revision. Answers are correct, complete, and clear; all lesson requirements have been met. All answers are in complete sentences and work is spell-checked, but may have a few grammatical errors.

8: All answers are correct after four or more revisions. Answers are correct, complete, and clear; all lesson requirements have been met. All answers are in complete sentences and work is spell-checked, but may have a few grammatical errors.

7: One or two answers are incorrect. All other answers are factually correct, complete, and clear. All lesson requirements have been met. All answers are in complete sentences and work is spell-checked, but may have a few grammatical errors.

6: Reserved for administrative use.

5: Plagiarism - purposeful or mistaken which will lower your final grade for the course (so be very careful when posting your work!); lack of effort, disrespect, or attitude (we are here to communicate with you if you don't understand something); or 9 or more errors; or lesson requirements have not been met.

Also be aware that you will have a chance to revise your work. More than 2 revisions will result in a lower grade, so read the directions carefully and make sure you meet the requirements. No lesson is complete without the approval of the instructor, and all revisions must be completed before a grade is assigned. No grade will be given for incomplete work.

Do not submit text that you have copied from sources, including websites. All of your work should be in your own words. Using copied text would be considered plagiarism. For more information, review our page on Plagiarism and Citation.

Part I

Submit to your instructor what Disney movie you intend to watch, and where you intend to read two versions of the original story. (There are lots of resources for individual folktales available freely online. You can find one such resource here. Be sure to give a full citation for the stories you intend to read.) The second version of the folktale can be a retelling from a slightly different time period or from a totally different culture, the choice is yours; one version, however, must be closely related to the movie.

If the Disney movie you chose is instead the retelling of a legend, you can find two separate sources that tell the story of that legend. Please note that this may require more citation and research than the folktale or fairytale option, and that if that is the case you are willingly taking on that extra work.

The teacher must approve your selections before you may proceed.

Note: Stories that you have already read as part of this course or will be reading later in this course are less likely to be approved, so be prepared to make a back-up selection.

Part II

Answer both the Analysis and Reflection sections below.

Analysis

For the movie

  1. For the movie, who are the main characters?
  2. What sort of people are the main characters? Describe their personalities
  3. What is the conflict in the movie? Be sure to discuss all the conflicts.
  4. What is the climax of the movie?
  5. What is the resolution of the movie?

For the first version of the folktale (or for one of your historical sources)

  1. For the folktale, who are the main characters?
  2. What sort of people are the main characters? Describe their personalities
  3. What is the conflict in the story? Be sure to discuss all the conflicts.
  4. What is the climax of the story?
  5. What is the resolution of the story?
  6. How would you categorize this folktale according to what you discovered in Lesson 9?

For the second version of the folktale (or for another of your historical sources)

  1. For the folktale, who are the main characters?
  2. What sort of people are the main characters? Describe their personalities
  3. What is the conflict in the story? Be sure to discuss all the conflicts.
  4. What is the climax of the story?
  5. What is the resolution of the story?
  6. How would you categorize this folktale according to what you discovered in Lesson 9?

Overall

  1. After analyzing the story elements, describe what exactly is different between the story and the movie versions.
  2. Why do you think the changes were made?
  3. Which version of the story do you enjoy more? Why? Be detailed, as there are both changes in story and changes in the medium to consider.

Reflection

Submit your work using the following form:

Name:
Enter your correct email address:





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The materials in this lesson are Compuhigh and may not be reused without express written permission.