Lesson 03: Types of Essays

Lesson Objectives:

 

 

  • Students will identify three types of essays: expository, persuasive, and informal.
  • Student writes an expository essay on the topic of their choice.
  • Students will identify a specific audience in which their essay addresses.
  • Student demonstrates a working knowledge of grammar, essay planning, and essay writing.


Essay writing is essential for proper communication of your thoughts and ideas.  When you write an essay you are organizing your thoughts into a coherent work for other people to understand exactly what you are trying to convey. 

The Main Parts of an Essay

 

There are four main parts to an essay.  They are:

A thesis statement is a single sentence that summarizes the entire point of your essay.  It is specific enough to let the reader know exactly what you will be talking about, and broad enough to not give away all the details immediately.
 
The introduction paragraph is an extension of the thesis.  It gives a general idea of your main points to be covered within the body paragraph.
 
The body paragraph contains sentences that support your thesis statement.  It is in the body paragraphs that you will share your ideas in detail.  Keep in mind, there may be more than one body paragraph, depending on the extent of your content.
 
The conclusion paragraph resummarizes all your main points.  It is like restating your introduction in different words to remind the reader about what they have just read.
 
Do some research on your own on the Internet to learn more about how to write a good essay.  There are plenty of sites available to the determined Internet surfer. 

Three Types of Essays

 

There are a variety of essays out there, but for this lesson, we want you to concentrate and study the following:
 
The Expository Essay: Whenever your purpose is to inform, explain how something works or how something is done, or to explain the meaning of concepts, historical events, works of art and so forth, your writing is expository. By explaining a topic to a reader, you are demonstrating your own knowledge. Check out an example here- http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/wi-plagiarism.htm
 
The Persuasive Essay: Your purpose in persuasive writing is to defend your side of an argument. You must choose a side, make a case for it, consider and refute the main opposition, and prove to undecided readers that your opinion is the best one. Remain fair to other opinions, as completely dismissing them weakens your argument.
 
The Informal Essay: The purpose of informal writing is mainly for enjoyment. It has a relaxed style rather than a formal one, and although it retains a strong structure, it is less rigid than a formal paper. The writer of an informal work speaks directly to the reader in a conversational style and strives to maintain a sense of his or her own personality in the writing. Such writing can be informative or persuasive, yet the onus remains on a relatively relaxed expression of opinion, observation, humor or pleasure.

Assignment:

Do not submit text that you have copied from sources, including websites. All of your work should be in your own words. Using copied text would be considered plagiarism. For more information, review our page on Plagiarism and Citation

Write an Expository Essay. The topic can be on anything that interests you.  Be sure to write in complete sentences.  Spell, capitalize and punctuate your work properly. The required length is 500 words.  Get started and have fun!

Grading Rubric:

To get a 10: You can have no grammatical errors, within the first revision. Paragraphs must be clear and focused; all lesson requirements have been met.
To get a 9: You can have 1 or 2 grammatical errors (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, wrong word, run-on sentences, sentence fragments, etc.). Paragraphs must be clear and focused; all lesson requirements have been met.
To get an 8: You can have 3 grammatical errors (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, wrong word, run-on sentences, sentence fragments, etc.). Paragraphs must be clear and focused; all lesson requirements have been met.
To get a 7: You can have 4 grammatical errors (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, wrong word, run-on sentences, sentence fragments, etc.) OR submission is complete, thoughtful and well-composed, but several grammatical errors remain. Paragraphs must be clear and focused; all lesson requirements have been met.
To get a 6: You can have 5 minor grammatical errors (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, wrong word, run-on sentences, sentence fragments, etc). Paragraphs must be clear and focused; lesson requirements have been met.
To get a 5: Plagiarism - purposeful or mistaken which will lower your final grade for the course (so be very careful when posting your work!); lack of effort, disrespect, or attitude (we are here to communicate with you if you don't understand something). Paragraphs must be clear and focused; lesson requirements have been met.

Be aware that you will have a chance to revise your work. More than 2 revisions will result in a lower grade, so read the directions carefully and make sure you meet the requirements.